The River With Two Names

Our current expedition is called The River with Two Names and it begins/began on August 15 when we fly into Harp Lake. After a few days paddling along the lake we will exit via the Harp River onto the the Adlatok River…or is it the Ogjoktok River? It turns out that the river has two names. Depending on the map you look at (especially how old the map is), depending on which trip report you uncover, and depending on which website you look at, the river has and had two names. Currently on the provincial road map, the upper part of the river is called the Adlatok River and then the branch of the river that leads to Ogjoktok Bay is called the Ogjoktok River. On Canadian topographical maps, the the upper part of the river is called the Ogjoktok River and then the branch of the river that leads to Adlatok Bay is called the Adlatok River. It’s also called the Ugjoktok River at the hydrographic monitoring station where you can see the water levels we are paddling.

We plan to take the northern branch to Adlatok Bay and hope sea conditions will allow us to paddle out to Hopedale to catch the coastal boat. Some may remember that a few years back, we paddled the Kanairiktok River and had hoped to paddled to Hopedale then. Both the Adlatok and the Ugjoktok ultimately join Kanairiktok Bay. So our fingers are crossed that we get to complete both of this trips by paddling to Hopedale.

Follow along and send us good thoughts as we adventure amid the bugs, bears, and wonders of the River with Two Names. You can also keep an eye on us here or through Facebook, or on Twitter.  Please scroll down to see our latest posts from the expedition. They will appear below from most recent to earlier ones.

Posted in Canoe, River With Two Names | Tagged , , , , | 1 Comment

Audio Post

Posted in Life | Tagged | Leave a comment

inReach message from TA Loeffler

D8 Off the Adlatok & camped at the head of Adlatok Bay. Big headwind. Too late to make headway after portage. Weather is cold Brrr

View the location or send a reply to TA Loeffler: https://us0.inreach.garmin.com/textmessage/txtmsg?extId=cc0aba31-745b-4ae9-8fcf-84edb96f0657&adr=miyu735rowe%40post.wordpress.com

TA Loeffler sent this message from: Lat 55.15788 Lon -60.622859

Do not reply directly to this message.

This message was sent to you using the inReach two-way satellite communicator with GPS. To learn more, visit http://explore.garmin.com/inreach.

Posted in Life | Leave a comment

inReach message from TA Loeffler

D7 Almost 2 the Labrador Sea. Halfway over last portage. River w/ two names became river with one name today: Adlatok. Black flies

View the location or send a reply to TA Loeffler: https://us0.inreach.garmin.com/textmessage/txtmsg?extId=710d5668-7d00-4533-8e4a-58c88d2a2e2d&adr=miyu735rowe%40post.wordpress.com

TA Loeffler sent this message from: Lat 55.147891 Lon -60.628223

Do not reply directly to this message.

This message was sent to you using the inReach two-way satellite communicator with GPS. To learn more, visit http://explore.garmin.com/inreach.

Posted in Life | Leave a comment

Audio Post

Posted in Life | Tagged | Leave a comment

inReach message from TA Loeffler

D6 you should have seen the boats sliding down the hill to the river…blue, yellow, red with us running behind. Braking gently

View the location or send a reply to TA Loeffler: https://us0.inreach.garmin.com/textmessage/txtmsg?extId=7729be69-e327-4f5a-a0e3-de884f84df67&adr=miyu735rowe%40post.wordpress.com

TA Loeffler sent this message from: Lat 55.041976 Lon -60.917988

Do not reply directly to this message.

This message was sent to you using the inReach two-way satellite communicator with GPS. To learn more, visit http://explore.garmin.com/inreach.

Posted in Life | Leave a comment

Audio Post

Posted in Life | Tagged | Leave a comment

inReach message from TA Loeffler

D5. Big day of going to & fro. All boats over our first long portage. 3 trips. 1 more 2morrow. Lots of heat, bugs, & no wind. Rain

View the location or send a reply to TA Loeffler: https://us0.inreach.garmin.com/textmessage/txtmsg?extId=487e8d67-477c-4127-9e98-a28c0f73ed69&adr=miyu735rowe%40post.wordpress.com

TA Loeffler sent this message from: Lat 55.025969 Lon -61.122179

Do not reply directly to this message.

This message was sent to you using the inReach two-way satellite communicator with GPS. To learn more, visit http://explore.garmin.com/inreach.

Posted in Life | Leave a comment

Audio Post

Posted in Life | Tagged | Leave a comment

inReach message from TA Loeffler

D3. Hiding from horrific black flies A large day w/ waterfalls, portages, paddling in/with to the wind. & a small incident where I wear bear spray No bears

View the location or send a reply to TA Loeffler: https://us0.inreach.garmin.com/textmessage/txtmsg?extId=e15a3878-0a40-40b9-85e5-1580f8a8708e&adr=miyu735rowe%40post.wordpress.com

TA Loeffler sent this message from: Lat 55.025775 Lon -61.121986

Do not reply directly to this message.

This message was sent to you using the inReach two-way satellite communicator with GPS. To learn more, visit http://explore.garmin.com/inreach.

Posted in Life | Leave a comment

inReach message from TA Loeffler

D3. Shapio Hilton. Big day exploring books & crannies of SL. Now camped at N end. Lots of exciting g tailwinds. White caps. Exit Shapio 2morrow. Great day.

View the location or send a reply to TA Loeffler: https://us0.inreach.garmin.com/textmessage/txtmsg?extId=8bd81272-8c8c-438b-aedf-95a6e48dc2aa&adr=miyu735rowe%40post.wordpress.com

TA Loeffler sent this message from: Lat 55.033554 Lon -61.193869

Do not reply directly to this message.

This message was sent to you using the inReach two-way satellite communicator with GPS. To learn more, visit http://explore.garmin.com/inreach.

Posted in Life | Leave a comment

Audio Post

Posted in Life | Tagged | Leave a comment

inReach message from TA Loeffler

A few days on Shapiro and then big portage back to Adlatok. Miss most of the rapids/portages. Then same plan as before. Super beauty day here. Blue sky. Mtns.

View the location or send a reply to TA Loeffler: https://us0.inreach.garmin.com/textmessage/txtmsg?extId=63f689a7-642e-4dd2-a654-e6487708b7cd&adr=miyu735rowe%40post.wordpress.com

TA Loeffler sent this message from: Lat 54.928465 Lon -61.325233

Do not reply directly to this message.

This message was sent to you using the inReach two-way satellite communicator with GPS. To learn more, visit http://explore.garmin.com/inreach.

Posted in Life | Leave a comment

inReach message from TA Loeffler

D2.Stunning beauty as we paddled W. up Shapio Lake to a tributary. Lunch on gravel bar. Easy paddle home in stiff tail wind. 22km

View the location or send a reply to TA Loeffler: https://us0.inreach.garmin.com/textmessage/txtmsg?extId=9e7fa0bb-8bb6-421f-9ff5-630be287fdca&adr=miyu735rowe%40post.wordpress.com

TA Loeffler sent this message from: Lat 54.928497 Lon -61.325233

Do not reply directly to this message.

This message was sent to you using the inReach two-way satellite communicator with GPS. To learn more, visit http://explore.garmin.com/inreach.

Posted in Life | Leave a comment

Audio Post

Posted in Life | Tagged | Leave a comment

inReach message from TA Loeffler

Settling in nicely. Camp is gorgeous. We are “Harp-Broken” but adjusting to our new trip plan. Rewarded with great views today

View the location or send a reply to TA Loeffler: https://us0.inreach.garmin.com/textmessage/txtmsg?extId=43ec6c75-6a15-4976-8b90-6ff12d88c3c5&adr=miyu735rowe%40post.wordpress.com

TA Loeffler sent this message from: Lat 54.928497 Lon -61.325254

Do not reply directly to this message.

This message was sent to you using the inReach two-way satellite communicator with GPS. To learn more, visit http://explore.garmin.com/inreach.

Posted in Life | Leave a comment

inReach message from TA Loeffler

Flexibility is key while adventuring. New trip start on Shapiro Lake due to socked in conditions over Harp Lake. Thanks Keith!

View the location or send a reply to TA Loeffler: https://us0.inreach.garmin.com/textmessage/txtmsg?extId=cf4dd89e-21e0-4585-aafb-97425ea2cc51&adr=miyu735rowe%40post.wordpress.com

TA Loeffler sent this message from: Lat 54.928293 Lon -61.32504

Do not reply directly to this message.

This message was sent to you using the inReach two-way satellite communicator with GPS. To learn more, visit http://explore.garmin.com/inreach.

Posted in Life | Leave a comment

inReach message from TA Loeffler

Hading our from Otter Creek Float Plane Base. Catch ya from the River with Two Names

View the location or send a reply to TA Loeffler: https://us0.inreach.garmin.com/textmessage/txtmsg?extId=03b16f2b-ebc0-47b3-a85b-83f349036af8&adr=miyu735rowe%40post.wordpress.com

TA Loeffler sent this message from: Lat 53.352442 Lon -60.411458

Do not reply directly to this message.

This message was sent to you using the inReach two-way satellite communicator with GPS. To learn more, visit http://explore.garmin.com/inreach.

Posted in Life | Leave a comment

River of Two Names: The Team is in Goose Bay

Meet the team. Mark, Darren, Marian, and me. Eating a cone at The A & W in Goose Bay. It’s a tradition.

Another tradition is visiting the old Hudson Bay Company Post Museum in NW River. They have great wooden models depicting traditional life in Labrador as well as an extensive collection related to the Hubbard’s.

Mina Hubbard’s book, A Woman’s Way through Unknown Labrador, first introduced me to Labrador. I’ve read about her extensively and even presented an academic paper about her once. She’s one of my many outdoor women heroes.

I won’t quite look like this tomorrow but perhaps in two weeks. If you haven’t read about her 1905 expedition, I highly recommend it. I saw evidence today at the museum of “fake news” about Mina. One newspaper article claimed she’d quite even though her expedition was very successful.

She did what she set out to do and so we hope to as well. We are reporting to the float plane base at 6:30 and hope to be flying by 7:30 am. Catch you tomorrow from Harp Lake. Now I have to finish packing and get some zzz’s.

PS. The red dot is Harp Lake.

Posted in Life | Leave a comment

inReach message from TA Loeffler

Testing the Inreach. Still in St John’s. heading to the Big Land on Wednesday. Congrats to the Tickle Swimmers.

View the location or send a reply to TA Loeffler: https://us0.inreach.garmin.com/textmessage/txtmsg?extId=7c667a37-908e-4d23-86cc-ad345e405880&adr=miyu735rowe%40post.wordpress.com

TA Loeffler sent this message from: Lat 47.573365 Lon -52.752378

Do not reply directly to this message.

This message was sent to you using the inReach two-way satellite communicator with GPS. To learn more, visit http://explore.garmin.com/inreach.

Posted in Life | Leave a comment

Less than One Week and Counting: River with Two Names

As part of our last minute preparations for the River with Two Names expedition, we took our new WaterLily 12v turbine out yesterday for a test spin. We walked over to the Rennies River and placed in in a few spots to get a sense of what it can do in terms of output.

Last year on Paddling North we had the USB version but the 12 volt version is more versatile for our needs since it will allow the direct charging of our sat phone as well as a few other photo & tech items. In the picture above, it looks like the waterlily is my heart-it may end up being the heart of our power generation depending on our water conditions and camp sites. The Waterlily seems to work best where there is a constriction in the current so here’s hoping we camp beside a few of those while on the river. The idea for the Waterlily actually has roots in our Kanairiktok River expedition in 2015 where we needed to make some sat phone calls for end of trip logistics and watched our sat phone drain and there was no sun to be had to generate power through our solar panel. This prompted the Waterlily folks to adapt some tech for the needs of outdoor adventurers.

The folks at WaterLily gave us this nifty device that will assist us in maximizing output from the Waterlily as well as our solar panel. We ill have both on this trip so we can generate power from either or both depending on conditions. In order to provide daily updates, captures photographs and video along the way, and maintain our ability to have emergency communications, I appreciate the redundancy in electricity generation systems. I’ll do a longer blog post about how our systems worked out after the trip.

Along with WaterLily testing, we’d had the solar panel out. I’ve just reactivated my Garmin Inreach and will send a test message later today or tomorrow. You can see the map and where we are at this link. We’ve been fitting our gear and food into barrels and waterproof bags and attending to what seem like hundreds of details in both putting life here in St. John’s on pause and making our Labrador expedition a reality. Please follow along and send us good thoughts as we adventure amid the bugs, bears, and wonders of the River with Two Names. You can also keep an eye on us through Facebook and Twitter. Catch you next from Labrador.

Posted in Canoe, River With Two Names | Tagged , , , , , | 2 Comments

The River with Two Names: Two Weeks and Counting

Two weeks and counting. We had a wonderful event last night on Long Pond where we introduced the joys of canoeing to some New Canadians and their conversation partners. It was a great partnership between School of Human Kinetics, Student Services, and the Association for New Canadians. I annotated the photo above with some common parts you might hear us use during audio updates.

Mark has been busy watching the news for relevant items as we get closer to our trip. One recent pst he sent mentioned swarming black flies: https://nationalpost.com/news/canada/hundreds-of-black-flies-attack-labrador-woman We are packing fly dope as well as our head nets and bug jackets-which say be know henceforth as our “happy places.” We will also be travelling south at the end of our trip on the next Labrador coastal boat: https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/newfoundland-labrador/kamutik-w-maiden-voyage-1.5225946 Hopefully sea conditions allow us to get all the way to Hopedale and ride the new ferry.

We are also watching the weather: https://weather.gc.ca/city/pages/nl-38_metric_e.html It looks like Hopedale is having a cool and wet summer thus far. Today in St. John’s it’s hot and sunny and the squashes in our garden are loving it. We’ll make sure to pack our woolies because 8 degrees and rain can be quite chilly. As we ended neared the end of our big trip, Paddling North, last year-it got much cooler and wetter as we approached the Arctic Circle. Here’s a fun post from last year as we were looking back as well as forward to the last kilometres of our trip: https://taloeffler.com/2018/08/02/paddling-north-2739-kilometres-of-memories/

I’ve mentioned the legendary salmon fishing on the Adlatok River. Here is a newspaper clipping from September 1963 reporting that a 27.5 pound salmon had been caught on the river.

OK-off to do more prep. Stay tuned.

Posted in River With Two Names | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Audio Post

Posted in Life | Tagged | Leave a comment

The River with Two Names: Three Weeks & Counting

A graph of water levels indicating that the amount of water in the Ugjoktok River is decreasing

Our expedition team met last night with Richard Alexander to go over the map, see some pictures, and get some beta (information) from him. We then (almost) finalized our group gear list with who is bringing what. The excitement is building as are the butterflies (they always seem to show up about this time before an expedition). This is the time where final gear, clothing, tech, and boat decisions are made. The picture above shows current flow rates below Harp Lake, where we will begin the trip. You’ll notice that the monitoring station names the river as the Ugjoktok. As mentioned in my previous post, the river we are paddling has two different names with a few different spellings depending on who you ask, the age of the map, and when people have travelled the river in the past. It’s been very interesting to explore the practices of geographical naming and which names are on the map as we prepare for our expedition.

Jamie Jackman was kind enough to answer my query about the river’s names. This is what he replied:

“Ujutok is the main river and empties into a Ujutok Bay just south of Adlatok Bay. Adlatok River flows out of the Ujutok River. This is all according to my father. However, I’ve heard the main river referred to as Adlatok right from the height of land and that it empties into Ujutok and Adlatok…the Adlatok branch of the river being referred to as the Adlatok River. This is not surprising however as maps around here are not always accurate in regards to place names – more work needs to be done on this before the real place names are lost forever, in my opinion.

Adlatok is an anglicised version of the word “Allatok” or “Allatuk” or “Allaktuk” – I’ve seen it written each way – which, from my understanding, translates roughly to “place of the Innu” or “where there are Innu.” Allak being the Inuit word for “Innu.” The Innu would travel along this river from inland and come out at Adlatok Bay on their way to trade furs. The Bay was frequently visited by Innu travellers who would stop to visit the Inuit-settlers who lived there later on, my grandparents.

As for Ujutok, according to my cousin Brian, derives from the Inuit word for seal: ujuk – so Ujutok or “Ujuktuk” means roughly “where there are seal.”

This image is the cover of the Newfoundland Quarterly. It is a watercolour painting of the the Adlatok River with Northern Lights above it. The Northern Lights are depicted as dancing white streaks in a blue sky. The are reflected in the river.

I have been searching the MUN Library and Digital Archives and found the above edition of the Newfoundland Quarterly from Fall 1991/Winter 1992. The cover features a watercolour of the Northern lights above the Adlatok River. The artist is not named in the edition but captures the beauty of both the sky, land, and water so well. I also recently learned that the late President George H.W. Bush had fished the Adlatok River and that folks from all over the world, come to fish there. The largest salmon ever caught in this province was landed on the River of Two Names (though likely one of the two branches since there are high falls that might block the salmon’s progress upstream). In a 1994 Toronto Star article, that said that President Bush had fallen in love with Labrador as was quoted as saying, “I left about a year ago, almost to this day, and for the in- between 365 days we’ve been thinking of nothing except coming back up here to the Adlatok,” he said.” I know from past expeditions in Labrador, that I will likely feel the same. Each trip there occupies a portion of my heart and soul and I often look at the Labrador pictures that adorn our walls at home and wish to be there again.

Marian and I depart St. John’s for Goose Bay on August 14. Mark, Darren, Marian and I fly into Harp Lake on August 15. Stay tuned as preparations continue and please do follow along while we paddle this most amazing river.

This image shows a map of Labrador zoomed in on Harp Lake and shows our expedition route from Harp Lake to Hopedale.

Adlatok/Ugjogtok Route Overview

Posted in Canoe, River With Two Names | Tagged , , , , , | 1 Comment

Coming Next: A River with Two Names

Thanks to all who played “Which expedition is next?” a few weeks back. I realized that I never confirmed what river we are paddling in mid August…so here goes. Our next expedition is called The River with Two Names and it begins on August 15 when we fly into Harp Lake. After a few days paddling along the lake we will exit via the Harp River onto the the Adlatok River…or is it the Ogjoktok River? It turns out that the river has two names. Depending on the map you look at (especially how old the map is), depending on which trip report you uncover, and depending on which website you look at, the river has and had two names. Currently on the provincial road map, the upper part of the river is called the Adlatok River and then the branch of the river that leads to Ogjoktok Bay is called the Ogjoktok River. On Canadian topographical maps, the the upper part of the river is called the Ogjoktok River and then the branch of the river that leads to Adlatok Bay is called the Adlatok River.

We plan to take the northern branch to Adlatok Bay and hope sea conditions will allow us to paddle out to Hopedale to catch the coastal boat. Some may remember that a few years back, we paddled the Kanairiktok River and had hoped to paddled to Hopedale then. Both the Adlatok and the Ogjoktok ultimately join Kanairiktok Bay. So our fingers are crossed that we get to complete both of this trips by paddling to Hopedale.

Not wanting to take sides and needing to much more research and learning about the river, its names, its place, and the folks who have lived by it and travelled it, we will call by both it’s names for now. I enjoyed looking through some archival documents yesterday and noticed several different spellings of the river’s names as well. Here is a picture of one of the falls we will likely have to portage around. It is from the MUN Online Library Archive. It is identified as “Paget River Falls in Allatok” and indexed as Adlatok.

I also enjoyed reading this entry in the Encyclopedia of Labrador entitled: A is for Adlatok written by Jamie Jackman, Program Director at the Labrador Institute. In his article, Jamie mentions what the word Adlatok comes from: “The Adlatok River flows eastward from the Quebec-Labrador boarder and empties into both Adlatok Bay and Ujutok Bay. In the past, Innu hunters and their families used parts of the 258 kilometre-long waterway as a travel route from the country’s interior to the trading post at Hopedale. The name comes from the Inuit word Allaktok, meaning “where there are Innu.”” Jamie has a family connection to the river and community of Adlatok. He mentions that those who visit “quickly fall in love with Adlatok Bay, evident in the way many earlier pioneers and leaders discuss its natural beauty in Labradorian literature.” In the next weeks, I’ll be looking for some of that literature and I’ll continue to share what I find. If my experience in other parts of Labrador are any indication, I’m sure the Adlatok/Ogjoktok River will take up residence in my heart.

Posted in Canoe, River With Two Names | Tagged , , , , , | 1 Comment

Pretty Big Climb: Yala Peak

This is a summit photo of Marian and I (and Niranjan who trying to hide in the background) on the summit of Yala Peak. We climbed the peak over two days on our Pretty Big Walk expedition. Most folks were surprised since they didn’t know we had a climb planned.

We climbed to Yala Peak high camp (4800 metres) from Khanjin Gompa (after acclimating there for a day and climbing to Little Khanjin Ri at 4300 metres.) We might have climbed higher to the top of Khanjin Ri (4700 metres) but the clouds rolled in and took away the view. The pull to Yala Peak high camp took about 5 hours. It was a contouring up with some steep sections thrown in for character development.

We rested and prepared for the rest of the day. Wake up call came at 5 am the next day and we choked down some porridge and tried to breathe away our small altitude headaches. We decided to proceed and started up from high camp trying to find the ideal “I can go uphill all day pace.” The initial sections of the climb were gentle up which allowed us to find a rhythm before the steeper sections. We were climbing on snow ( and some rock) all the way.

After about 4 hours of climbing, we reached the final ridge which was a bit exposed so our guide folks placed a hand line. You can see me above making the last few steps to the summit and Marian doing the same below.

The view from the summit was incredible and one of the most memorable and clear of all the summits I’ve been on. The weather was stable so we all took lots of photos. Here is our guide Shyam on the summit.

We could see the junction of three glacial valleys and even into Tibet. It was 360 degree mountains and my inner Snow Lion soared.

Although relatively small by Nepal standards, Yala Peak is only 400 metres shorter than Canada’s highest peak and is taller than three of the Seven Summits. It was great to be out finding my climbing legs and my climbing mind once again and we did have to dig a bit deep to start and finish the climb.

The funny story about why we chose to climb Yala Peak has to do with a hotel we stayed in often here in Kathmandu during the fall of 2017. We found the Yala Peak hotel on booking.com and ended up loving the friendly family feel of the place. We stayed there five different times during our various ins and outs that fall. In their lobby, they had a map of the Langtang Valley with Yala Peak at the end.

That planted a seed and when the Pretty Big Walk came together, I realized we had our chance to climb Yala Peak. We dropped by the hotel the other night to show off our summit photo. So done folks climb a peak because it is there, we climbed this one as a tribute to some kind folks in Nepal and to our two new granddaughters, Anna and Sylvia. It was a Pretty Big Climb within a Pretty Big Walk.

Many thanks to Raj at Mountain Sun Valley Treks for setting up our logistics and staffing for the Pretty Big Walk/Climb and to Shyam and Niranjan who climbed Yala Peak with us (as well as making the Pretty Big Walk a grand success through your leadership).

Posted in Pretty Big Walk | Tagged , , , | 2 Comments

Pretty Big City

After a two hour Jeep ride through Shivapuri National Park from Chisopani to the outskirts of Kathmandu, we were welcomed back to the city with an instant case of sensory overload and traffic.

Arriving in mid city amid thousands of motorcycles and Tuk Tuke, we thanked our trek crew and began the transition back from trek/walk life. Life has changed from sleep, eat, walk, eat, walk, eat, sleep to many more choices and options. We dropped into old favourites Momo Tarou and the Rosemary Kitchen to ease our way back into fending for ourselves.

We caught up with Raj and Kumar. We dried all our our camping gear and did a bit of shopping. We are easing in slowly and still managed 13,000 steps today around Thamel. With cell coverage all around, I’ve been posting many photos to social media and I learned that the Grade Fours in Mme Dooley’s class were also following along on the Pretty Big Walk. I want to send a shout out to them as well as the Grade Fives and Sixes at Fogo Central and to the students at St. Anne’s in SE Bight. It was great to have you all along and I’ll post more pictures over the next few days.

Since we’ve mostly been going to bed around 7:30 pm with sunset, it’s time to turn out the electric light and gets some sleep. Tomorrow is another big day.

Posted in Pretty Big Walk | Tagged , , | 1 Comment

Audio Post

Posted in Pretty Big Walk | Tagged , , , | 4 Comments

Audio Post

Posted in Pretty Big Walk | Tagged , , , | 2 Comments

Audio Post

Posted in Pretty Big Walk | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Audio Post

Posted in Pretty Big Walk | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Audio Post

Posted in Pretty Big Walk | Tagged , , , , | 3 Comments

Yala Peak Summit-Pretty Big Walk/Climb

Hello from Thulo Syabru. A wee bit of cell coverage before we head up into the Gosainkund Region. We are on the home stretch having walked back out of the Langtang (the long way) and we have now made the turn for the walk back to Kathmandu via the Helumbu Himal.

Catch ya tonight via sat phone.

Posted in Pretty Big Walk | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Audio Post

Posted in Pretty Big Walk | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Audio Post

Posted in Pretty Big Walk | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Audio Post

Posted in Pretty Big Walk | Tagged , , , , | 3 Comments

Audio Post

Posted in Pretty Big Walk | Tagged , , , , | 1 Comment

Audio Post

Posted in Pretty Big Walk | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Audio Post

Posted in Pretty Big Walk | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Audio Post

Posted in Pretty Big Walk | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment