Paddling North

Marian and I are “Paddling North” and you are invited! We will be leaving Jasper, Alberta on May 17 and paddling north approximately 3400 kilometres to the Arctic Ocean at Tuktoyaktuk, Northwest Territories and hope to arrive there in mid August. We will travel along four different rivers and we hope you’ll come along for the adventure. We will be accompanied by our Adventure Pig, Delilah. You can follow the expedition here at www.taloeffler.com where we will be posting SPOT updates as well as an audio post daily. Where cellular or wifi coverage exist on the route, we will also try to post some pictures of our adventures, as well. You can also see pictures on my Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter accounts (all are @taloeffler). Take care and catch you from four rivers while we are paddling north!

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Paddling North: Last Sip Of Luxury and Learning About Norman Wells

Our wonderful host, Sue, took us out for lunch buffet and then feasted us on BBQ this evening including ice cream and Mars Bar for dessert. That’s two desserts in one day-what treats! Such a pleasure to have fresh veggies and fruit. Such a treat to have someone else cook and such a treat to learn more about the places that we are traveling through. This is our last place along the route where we had an introduction to a potential host so unless some river angel surprises us, this was our last bit of luxury living until we finish the expedition. We are clean, well fed, and ready to paddle our next phase to Fort Good Hope approximately 200 km downriver.

Sue suggested we visit the local museum and learn more about Norman Wells and the CANOL pipeline. We enjoyed the visit so much and wished we had more time to visit it again. Neither of us understood the immensity of the CANOL project and, while watching a newsreel about it, realized that we essentially have paddled/traveled the supply route for the project. The picture above was a recruiting poster for folks to work on the project. It could also sum up the realities of paddling North :-). It was very interesting to see the newsreel footage of Fort Fitzgerald, Fort Smith, Tulita (then called Fort Norman) from the 1940’s. You may recall that two days ago we attempted to find the original oil well drilled at Bluefish Creek in 1920. Today at the museum we saw a picture of what it looked like nearly 100 years ago. We landed the canoe just below where the white building would have been but the hillside is now completely overgrown with thorny roses and alders. We did find a few pipes but that was all. It was called Discovery Well and started the oil boom here.

I said in my update yesterday that I was getting buff and strong in the upper body and small in the legs…smallest they have been in my adult life actually (nothing like sitting all day for 2 months). I have photographic evidence of my transformation.

I also have photographic evidence of how big the bugs are up here.

Over lunch, we shared stories of our trip, the wildlife we’ve seen and the barges that almost ran us over and the immense intense beauty we see daily. We have seen and experienced so much and we still have almost a month to go. Temperatures will begin to drop and there will soon be a hint of autumn on the wind but we hope for calm days that will keep us #Paddlingnorth for nearly another 800 kilometres.

Catch ya from the river!

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Paddling North: Km 2178 and Counting

The last time I was on approach to Norman Wells 3.5 months ago, it was much colder and much whiter. Marian and I were headed to Inuvik and #paddlingnorth was a motley collection of dried food, an oversized bughouse, a few bytes gleaned from books and blogs, and a dream ready to be hatched and given wings.

Today, as we neared the island in the photo above, it was much bluer and we are much more tanned (and dressed in less clothing) and #paddlingnorth is 64 days strong and we have 2178 kilometres under our canoe seats.

As we’ve entered the “third trimester” of the mud/bug/sand/wind/thunderstorm/big water/big distance/amazing/beauty filled/deep/moving fest, temptations to begin reflecting on the expedition and all of its experiences are high.

We are back in Norman Wells, having paddled here from Jasper, and it’s hard to express both the pride and disbelief that we are here. That we, despite a short time frame for planning and preparation, made the expedition happen and that we have paddled 13 degrees of latitude to be back here in Norman Wells.

Yesterday we paddled by the place where the first oil well was drilled in the 1920’s. At the time, it was one of the largest oil finds in Canada and the reason why Norman Wells exists today. It was so cool to paddle by the Norman Mountain Range today that we flew beside in March.

We are staying with a sister of two friends here in Norman Wells. Again, like so many other times on this trip, we are being spoiled by our host. Nothing like a shower and home cooked meal to perk us up. After the shower, I notice that my arms and shoulders are looking buff and strong while my legs are shrinking daily. I’ve never seen my calf muscles be so small. Nothing like sitting most of the days to take the good outta your legs. Climbing Signal Hill this fall will be tough at first but Ill get back at it because as we’ve paddled beside so many beautiful mountains, I’m getting the itch to climb some.

Thanks for all your kind words and support. They mean so much. Thanks as well to Krissy Holmes for the great interview on CBC Morning Show and for coining a new handle for me, “Adventure Ninja.”

Time to hit the hay. No worries about bears tonight so I plan to sleep deep!

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Check-in/OK message from SPOT TA

Device Name: TA
Latitude: 65.27699
Longitude: -126.79761
GPS location Date/Time: 07/20/2018 00:22:36 NDT

Message: TA & Marian are paddling to the Arctic Ocean. Check the map to see where they are paddling & exploring today!

Click the link below to see where I am located.
http://fms.ws/yswor/65.27699N/126.79761W

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You have received this message because “TA” has added you to its SPOT contact list and attempted to contact you.

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Check-in/OK message from SPOT TA

Device Name: TA
Latitude: 65.13625
Longitude: -126.31152
GPS location Date/Time: 07/19/2018 03:49:59 NDT

Message: TA & Marian are paddling to the Arctic Ocean. Check the map to see where they are paddling & exploring today!

Click the link below to see where I am located.
http://fms.ws/yq6SN/65.13625N/126.31152W

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You have received this message because “TA” has added you to its SPOT contact list and attempted to contact you.

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Paddling North: Evening Paddle to Tulita

After sitting out for a good chunk of the day… and good thing we got the tarp up because the thunderstorms did indeed boom and flash and pour, the wind died and the sky cleared enough to paddle to Tulita.

We passed the Smoking Hills where coals seams have been burning for eons. We were also treated to a rainbow and buttery evening light that went on for the whole paddle. It’s like the weather was trying to kiss and make up. Now we’re trying to sleep with the sounds of trucks driving all around us and me trying to keep a rather tame fox from digging a hole through our canoe cover. Oh the trials and tribulations. Tomorrow we will visit Tulita and get a few supplies at the Northern store before starting to paddle towards Norman Wells. Winds are supposed to be up again in the morning but then going to light.

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Check-in/OK message from SPOT TA

Device Name: TA
Latitude: 64.89914
Longitude: -125.57320
GPS location Date/Time: 07/18/2018 04:25:53 NDT

Message: TA & Marian are paddling to the Arctic Ocean. Check the map to see where they are paddling & exploring today!

Click the link below to see where I am located.
http://fms.ws/yn5qm/64.89914N/125.57320W

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Paddling North: Wind, Thunder, and Lightning Oh My!

It’s been a week full of “split shifts” due to wind and thunderstorms. Our last full paddling day was our 105 km day. Before that and after that, we’ve been “beached”, somewhat like being benched by a coach in sport, forced to sit out when you desperately want to play. The picture above shows yesterday’s hideout. We were driven off the water by a sudden increase of wind then hurt rumbles and saw a huge swath of “evil greyness” headed straight for us, belching thunder and lightning as it neared us. We put up the tarp in record speed, hunkered down in our rain gear under the tarp, and waited for weather armageddon. Fortunately, it veered east and we were only left with a rising wind.

We paddled late in the afternoon fighting a headwind but proud of the bold paddling we did. We stopped for dinner and then decided to make camp given the colour and make up of the cloud layers. The wind relented and we wished, this morning, that we’d paddled some before calling it a night.

We woke this morning to pounding rain and some wind. Rather than start the day soaked, we slept a bit more and emerged from the tent once another dark grey mass of clouds had passed over. The wind appeared to be rising again but we knew Police Island would likely yield easy take offs if needed. And as we rounded the island and came into the full teeth of a 25 knot west wind and some wonky wind of current waves attenuated by a point, we pulled off again. We hiked around the island some and having rounded it, could find a little coverage from Tulita and got updated weather.

So we are benched again until evening, likely with some more thunderheads moving in, so time to go put up the tarp a.k.a safe haven and be ready to hunker down. We are obviously not in charge around here and must yield our plans, schedules, and frustration to the wind, waves, and clouds. It’s a good exercise in groundlessness and I’m reminded of one on my favourite Lojong slogans, “Whichever of the two occurs, be patient.” So, patience it is, whether we #paddlenorth or not

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Check-in/OK message from SPOT TA

Device Name: TA
Latitude: 64.83183
Longitude: -125.13344
GPS location Date/Time: 07/17/2018 00:43:33 NDT

Message: TA & Marian are paddling to the Arctic Ocean. Check the map to see where they are paddling & exploring today!

Click the link below to see where I am located.
http://fms.ws/yjrDG/64.83183N/125.13344W

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Check-in/OK message from SPOT TA

Device Name: TA
Latitude: 64.54107
Longitude: -124.92891
GPS location Date/Time: 07/16/2018 02:33:01 NDT

Message: TA & Marian are paddling to the Arctic Ocean. Check the map to see where they are paddling & exploring today!

Click the link below to see where I am located.
http://fms.ws/yh9gv/64.54107N/124.92891W

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Check-in/OK message from SPOT TA

Device Name: TA
Latitude: 64.09911
Longitude: -124.43742
GPS location Date/Time: 07/15/2018 02:56:59 NDT

Message: TA & Marian are paddling to the Arctic Ocean. Check the map to see where they are paddling & exploring today!

Click the link below to see where I am located.
http://fms.ws/yeuOf/64.09911N/124.43742W

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Check-in/OK message from SPOT TA

Device Name: TA
Latitude: 63.31504
Longitude: -123.66290
GPS location Date/Time: 07/14/2018 00:36:06 NDT

Message: TA & Marian are paddling to the Arctic Ocean. Check the map to see where they are paddling & exploring today!

Click the link below to see where I am located.
http://fms.ws/yc1OX/63.31504N/123.66290W

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How #PaddlingNorth is Like Climbing Everest

As I was paddling last evening against a potentially building wind, I thought about how this expedition shares similarities with climbing Everest. I’ve made three attempts at climbing Everest and reached a high point of 7600 metres in 2010. I’m currently on day 58 of this expedition (paddling 3000 km between Jasper, Alberta and Tuktoyaktuk, Northwest Territories) in my tent being blasted by wind and baked by the sun and am flooded with memories of similar times on the flanks of Everest.

So you ask, “how are the two expeditions alike?”

1. Both are long expeditions. Everest is usually a 50-60 day expedition and this one is 90 days.

2. Both involve living in a tent for most of the expedition with your tent being key to your safety and securing. A thin nylon cocoon, that is both surprisingly resilient and remarkably fragile. A sudden intense gust can break a pile which can rip a hole in seconds if your tent is not properly secured ( or sometimes even if it is).

3. Both involve leaving positions of relative security to move through the landscape, exposed to intense elements of weather, topography, and water/ice. These intense environments can change from awe inspiring and easy to terrifying and life threatening in the time it takes to consult your map.

4. Both involve moving through the above in the dark, at dusk or dawn, with little sleep. This makes such movement more challenging than moving in the daytime but also more special and rewarding as you are treated to displays of stars, planets, and the wicked dance of the sun setting or rising.

5. Both involve the ability to stay focused and motivated for the long haul. Everest requires that you traverse lower camps repeatedly as you acclimatize to the altitude and paddling North requires that you paddle a marathon most days and then set up camp. You must ride waves of motivational doldrums when weather forces you to sit still and progress stalls for several days in a row. You must be able to stay positive and committed to your expedition goals on both easy and difficult days.

6. Both involve spending time away from friends, family, and support networks in remote locations where rescue is very expensive and never guaranteed. Current communications technology helps cross this divide but it can be time-consuming and sometimes distracting, to keep all electronics working to enable such contact across the miles.

7. Both involve “Stay or Go” decisions at regular intervals where you need to assess weather and environmental conditions as well as health and psychological factors in deciding whether to push on or stay put.

8. Both are deeply rewarding, intensely challenging, and ask you to be the best adventurer/climber/paddler/teammate you can be.

9. Both (for me anyway) are spiritual quests that connect me to my core to the landscapes I am traversing, regularly humble me to my core, and provide embodied lessons of spiritual teachings around every corner and crevasse.

10. Both involve long months of planning and preparation that are indeed, part of the expedition.

OK. Gotta stop for now since the wind is gusting more strongly and I want to add more guy lines our our cocoon. I love having you along on this (and all my expeditions). Sharing the experiences helps me understand them more deeply.

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Check-in/OK message from SPOT TA

Device Name: TA
Latitude: 63.31504
Longitude: -123.66289
GPS location Date/Time: 07/13/2018 03:28:01 NDT

Message: TA & Marian are paddling to the Arctic Ocean. Check the map to see where they are paddling & exploring today!

Click the link below to see where I am located.
http://fms.ws/yZIZm/63.31504N/123.66289W

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Paddling North: These Boots Were Made for Humbling

So this happened. I wax eloquently about the experience of being in this vast place and then it smacks me down a few notches. My mom used to say, “Don’t get too big for your britches,” when we were acting cocky as kids. This place offers the same advice to me fairly often or in others words, it hands me my @ss!

Let me interpret the image above. One of my boots is absolutely suctioned into 15 inches of quick clay, the other boot, most fortunately, is not. This is my deepest sinking into quick clay of the trip and to quote parental advice one more time, “I should have known better.”

You see, we were going for a walk to see if there was a better place to move camp to, to get out of the wind. We’d walked to a point and then I noticed a small bay that would be in the lee if we could get to it. The only thing in our way was a one foot wide stream.

We’d been visited by some dogs last evening and we saw their prints at the stream crossing. They had sunk into the clay quite a bit for medium sized dogs. That should been my first clue and raised a warning in my mind. We’d also spent weeks dealing with quick clay loads and unloads of our canoe sling the Athabasca and Slave Rivers. This should have been my second clue. We learned to use driftwood as floatation we wouldn’t sink so bad and have to fight the suction.

It’s very handy most of the time that Marian and I have “different wiring.” I’m prone to jumping in with both feet, often off diving boards or cliff edges whereas Marian, takes her time, analyzes the entire scene then wades in a little more gently than I.

Thank the goddess for that this morning, as without that pacing difference, I would no longer have two boots to wear on the trip.

So, back to the stream, I thought if I just moved quick enough, I could get over to the sand bank on the far side side of the stream. Wrong! My first three steps went well and the fourth one, not so much. My right boot sank. Sank big time. Instantly suctioned into place by the quick clay and the harder I struggled to extricate the boot, the deeper it sank (of course).

I finally stopped sinking at the one inch mark of my boot. I kept the other boot high on the bank but I was stuck big time. I suspect Marian had to bite the insides of her cheeks not to laugh at my predicament. She kindly began to fetch driftwood for flotation. One big log gave me a foothold for the free foot.

I began to use a stick to try to dig the clay out from around my boot. Without a shovel, it took hundreds of throws to reduce the amount of “wet cement” around the boot. As fast as I threw it away, it slumped back in. It was easy to be drawn to into frustration and helplessness but small increments of progress were noted. I tried extracting the boot by pulling with my foot with all my might and at other times, balanced precariously on the log in one socked foot, tried pulling with both hands. All to no avail and almost to being butt first in the quick clay by losing balance backwards.

Finally after an eternity of 25 minutes of stuckness and throwing oodles of mud, I finally managed to free the boot enough to release the suction at the heel and then with a bit more digging, the toe. Fortunately, Marian had dropped a log bridge for me to use, and I crossed back to firmer ground. Feeling humbled, embarrassed, and thoroughly spanked, I saw the series of decisions that led to me standing there trapped and almost helpless. If I’d been alone, it would have likely meant the loss of my boot. We walked back to camp, laughing at my poor judgement and reliving the finer points of getting me unstuck.

In my earlier post, I’d mentioned the short interval between decisions and consequences and this morning was no exception. It’s one of the main reasons why wilderness therapy can be so powerful for clients and why I love being out here so much. It regularly hands me my @ss and teaches me (experientially) to remember the big picture, to think before I leap, and to laugh hilariously (with compassion) at myself.

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Paddling North: This is a Big Place

A friend wrote and asked how we are experiencing this place and I have many answers. It is big. Vast. Huge. Humbling. Humbling to travel through. It reflects how small and insignificant we are on a daily basis but also how deeply we can feel and interpret the land and waterscape we are paddling through.

Sky and water are frequently inseparable up here and I feel that is true of us and this place. We are, at once, both in and of this place. This space. Deeply aware of instant changes in wind, waves, temperatures, clouds…deeply taught lessons of decisions and consequences, paths and paddles. We are both safe and at the edge. Remote and close. Home and away. Here, and likely other places if I listen well and drop in to truly experience a place, dichotomies melt away leaving me awestruck and moved.

This is a big expedition. We are entering Phase Ten (I have to count it out on my fingers). Breaking into phases and micro goals and milestones makes the bigness manageable. We’ve passed the halfway mark and can both sense the end around several turns but know there is still so much water to paddle and wind to sit out. The dichotomy of wanting it never to end and the reality of the daily grind of paddling a marathon a day also brings thoughts of post expedition life. Of wanting to be both home and away and fortunately, it is possible and we will keep reminding ourselves to continue to drop the dichotomies and to seek the present moment-both here and every day. For the present moment is rich, vast, and humbling.

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Paddling North: Kilometre 1852 Tempest in the Wine Glass

After I called in the audio update, we paddled a few km and decided to stop short of our island goal and make camp because the grey clouds were getting greyer and the wind was picking up again. We hurried and got the tent up, the boat secured and the few things we needed unloaded. Marian was getting things set up in the tent and I got a quick supper on the go. It was about 9 pm. The long days can play havoc with routines and the cues related to daylight are all off.

I took the two pictures above when I realized that the wind had died off and the evening looked like it was going to be a beaut! I boiled water for hot drinks and then started to warm some dish water waiting for Marian to emerge before starting the main course. She popped out and I thought, we’d best get the dinner cooked since rain is on the way ( we’d picked up a forecast in Wrigley).

Just as the quesadillas were finished, Marian said, “Look at that.” It appeared smoke or steam was rising from the island we hoped to reach. Then the water turned jade green (it’s usually steely grey or deep blue) and strange patterns we being woven into the current. The wind rose furiously and sand began to blow. Marian grabbed dinner and ran to jump into the tent to weigh it down.

I jumped into action to get the stove put away before it became clogged with flying sand-quite a challenge since it was still hot from cooking. 56 days of putting the kitchen away came nicely into play as I got it all back into place without feeding the hungry wind.

I added a few more rocks to every guy line on the tent and crawled into the tent for dinner which I’m happy to report wasn’t full of sand. “What was that? I exclaimed. “It came on so fast!” The tent shuttered and shook as we gulped down dinner and then it got quiet again and we emerged to check on the canoe dnd tent. We added more rocks, decided to have a wee bit more wine, and shared my last birthday Crunchie Bar for dessert.

It may be a long night as the wind has picked up again and rain is forecast. We just heard a low rumble and wondered what the wind was delivering to us now but it was the barge boat going by with supplies for communities and projects further North of here. Our boat, already pulled up high because of the threatening winds, was safe from its wake.

So, it may be a long night but we’ve hunkered down, secured the tent, our boat, and ourselves and consider sitting through this kind of weather, the price of admission for views such as this.

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Check-in/OK message from SPOT TA

Device Name: TA
Latitude: 63.24247
Longitude: -123.54485
GPS location Date/Time: 07/12/2018 02:47:53 NDT

Message: TA & Marian are paddling to the Arctic Ocean. Check the map to see where they are paddling & exploring today!

Click the link below to see where I am located.
http://fms.ws/yWHOF/63.24247N/123.54485W

If the above link does not work, try this link:

You have received this message because “TA” has added you to its SPOT contact list and attempted to contact you.

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Paddling North: It Was A Porcupine

Sorry I couldn’t call in last night. It was the porcupine’s fault. The one that visited us the night before during my update call. I went to go and try to get a pic and likely didn’t shut off the phone. When I went to call last night, the phone was dead.

Just arriving in Wrigley and grabbing some cell data. It’s been a gorgeous week of still waters to paddle. Today we had to sit out until 3:30 pm and then the stillness cane. The sun has been so intense we are calling it the Death Star.

We’ve been putting in good days on the water and the current has been helping as well. We’ve another 250 km under our canoe seats and we’ve crossed 10 degrees of latitude since leaving Jasper 56 days ago.

Each morning we offer a blessing and gratitude to the river and it is such a wonderful practice. It focuses our minds and assists in staying positive and grateful for whatever the day brings.

The river changes so much from day to day and sometimes kilometre to kilometre. Like us, it has moods, emotions, and a variety of looks and feels. It can be wide, narrow, fast, slow…

More soon…

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Check-in/OK message from SPOT TA

Device Name: TA
Latitude: 62.99227
Longitude: -123.24844
GPS location Date/Time: 07/11/2018 01:53:06 NDT

Message: TA & Marian are paddling to the Arctic Ocean. Check the map to see where they are paddling & exploring today!

Click the link below to see where I am located.
http://fms.ws/yTJtz/62.99227N/123.24844W

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You have received this message because “TA” has added you to its SPOT contact list and attempted to contact you.

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Check-in/OK message from SPOT TA

Device Name: TA
Latitude: 62.53698
Longitude: -123.20270
GPS location Date/Time: 07/10/2018 01:35:54 NDT

Message: TA & Marian are paddling to the Arctic Ocean. Check the map to see where they are paddling & exploring today!

Click the link below to see where I am located.
http://fms.ws/yQNLv/62.53698N/123.20270W

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Check-in/OK message from SPOT TA

Device Name: TA
Latitude: 62.13718
Longitude: -122.84184
GPS location Date/Time: 07/09/2018 01:07:26 NDT

Message: TA & Marian are paddling to the Arctic Ocean. Check the map to see where they are paddling & exploring today!

Click the link below to see where I am located.
http://fms.ws/yNbdQ/62.13718N/122.84184W

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Check-in/OK message from SPOT TA

Device Name: TA
Latitude: 61.97159
Longitude: -121.68008
GPS location Date/Time: 07/08/2018 01:59:51 NDT

Message: TA & Marian are paddling to the Arctic Ocean. Check the map to see where they are paddling & exploring today!

Click the link below to see where I am located.
http://fms.ws/yLGso/61.97159N/121.68008W

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Paddling North: Heading fit the Camsell Bend

Today was a rest/relax/plan/prep/weather day for us in Fort Simpson. Here Cat Cat helped us review river charts for the Deh Cho. Its interesting, after spending a week on the big river, to see the charts that the big boats use. We use a combo of topo maps at the 1:50,000 and 1:250,000 scales.

We bought a few perishables from The Northern, mailed another parcel home (Maaike-it’s coming to you), and poked about town. We backed up photos and enjoyed our first barbecue of the season. It was good to rest my hand as I’m walking a fine line between tendinitis and not.

In a few days, the Big River will swing North at the Camsell Bend and we will indeed, at that point be paddling North for weeks. Back on the river tomorrow-catch you from there.

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Paddling North: Odometer Moment 50 for 50

We paddled 50 kilometres today on Day 50 of our expedition, Paddling North. After several near misses, we finally got an odometer moment. Those who have been following me for awhile will know that I love odometer moments.

I also noticed 12:34 today. Another fine odometer moment. I always screenshot it when I do. This is from our expedition two summers ago to the Northern Labrador Coast south of Saglek.

We arrived in Fort Simpson today signalling the end of a Phase Eight.
We met a friend of a friend (Thanks Margaret for introducing us) and have enjoyed a shower, dinner with fresh vegetables, and lots of fine conversation. We sat out for about an hour on “Gros Cap”, the point of land between the Mackenzie and the Laird Rivers because of a thunderstorm. We quickly put up the tarp and prepared to wait it out but the big grey wall of cloud only rumbled and moved on. Don’t be fooled by the blue sky, the nasty looking sky was behind us.

We also thought we might get hammered by a storm last night but it moved off north of us. We’d packed up everything after dinner to make everything storm safe but we didn’t get anything then as well-just a few rumbles and dramatic skies.

We’ll set off tomorrow afternoon or the next morning depending on the forecast and our willingness to depart Fancy Camp II. It’s nice to enjoy the luxury of a hot shower and clean sheets now and then.

Catch ya tomorrow. Paddle North signing off from km 1605.

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Check-in/OK message from SPOT TA

Device Name: TA
Latitude: 61.68701
Longitude: -120.68063
GPS location Date/Time: 07/05/2018 01:53:55 NDT

Message: TA & Marian are paddling to the Arctic Ocean. Check the map to see where they are paddling & exploring today!

Click the link below to see where I am located.
http://fms.ws/yDIdW/61.68701N/120.68063W

If the above link does not work, try this link:

You have received this message because “TA” has added you to its SPOT contact list and attempted to contact you.

FindMeSPOT.com

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Paddling North: Settling In With a New Friend

We are settling in nicely to life on the Deh Cho / Mackenzie River and it welcomed us gently and then had bed. Throwing a wee bit of everything at us. Rain, thunder, wind, intense sun, amazing views, beavers, eagles, and all sorts of moods from slug like sea monster to roaring teenager, from still meditative elder to impish toddler.

We are settling in and learning the ins and outs of this big river. We are being challenged but not overwhelmed, asked to stretch but not break.

We just passed the 1500 km mark (. halfway) last night and today is day 49 of 90 or so. We thought about posing with our developing biceps in the wild roses and cautioning it, “ Guns and Roses” but we haven’t pulled it off yet.

Off to explore Jean Marie. Thanks for coming along.

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Check-in/OK message from SPOT TA

Device Name: TA
Latitude: 61.44251
Longitude: -120.43074
GPS location Date/Time: 07/04/2018 07:21:59 NDT

Message: TA & Marian are paddling to the Arctic Ocean. Check the map to see where they are paddling & exploring today!

Click the link below to see where I am located.
http://fms.ws/yAn1n/61.44251N/120.43074W

If the above link does not work, try this link:

You have received this message because “TA” has added you to its SPOT contact list and attempted to contact you.

FindMeSPOT.com

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Check-in/OK message from SPOT TA

Device Name: TA
Latitude: 61.29628
Longitude: -119.79962
GPS location Date/Time: 07/03/2018 01:43:34 NDT

Message: TA & Marian are paddling to the Arctic Ocean. Check the map to see where they are paddling & exploring today!

Click the link below to see where I am located.
http://fms.ws/y7O1s/61.29628N/119.79962W

If the above link does not work, try this link:

You have received this message because “TA” has added you to its SPOT contact list and attempted to contact you.

FindMeSPOT.com

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