Visual Soliloquy # 1273 The river has taught me to listen; you will learn from it, too. The river knows everything; one can learn everything from it. You have already learned from the river that it is good to strive downwards…

The river has taught me to listen; you will learn from it, too. The river knows everything; one can learn everything from it. You have already learned from the river that it is good to strive downwards, to sink, to seek the depths.
– Herman Hesse

Posted in Photography, Visual Soliloquy | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

In Honour of Michael Beecher Smith 4/27/2007

With today being Bell’s Let’s Talk day, I’m thinking of Michael and his family. He is dearly missed by so many. I thought I would re-post this blog entry that I did from Everest basecamp on April 27, 2007.

Location: Mount Everest South Basecamp

Elevation: 5200 Meters

Elevation Gain: 100 Meters

Weather: Sunny and Windy

Michael Beecher Smith was a young man with a huge, huge heart. He passed away in January and the loss is huge. I taught Michael in two classes at Memorial University (MUN). He was a delight to teach and my mind is filled with fond memories of him.

He was also on the wrestling team at MUN and so spent lots of time in the weight room. We often overlapped there and he was a huge supporter of all of my climbs. As a wrestler and weightlifter, Michael knew how to “play through pain.” He had to make weight for wrestling and he was always trying to get me to take my greens and other supplements because I was training so hard.

Michael seemed just to know when to throw in an encouraging word or come over and tell me to push the bar a little further than I thought I could. I feel his spirit with me here on Everest. He was so excited for me. I have thought of him often when the going has been so hard.

I know if Michael were alive today, he would be following my climb daily. With permission of his family, I decided to create a memorial for Michael here recognizing his spirit, his heart, and his tenacity in a way that will help me climb both the literal and figurative mountain in front of me.

This morning I hiked out about an hour from basecamp towards Pumori and Gorak Shep. At a spot we call “The Ridge”, I climbed off the beaten path to a flat bench of land with a spectacular view. This special spot is on the shoulder of Pumori. Pumori means “Daughter of Everest.” I’m taking liberties and thinking of Pumori as inclusive of “Son of Everest” as well.

This ridgeline overlooks Everest basecamp, the Khumbu Icefall, and when there are no clouds, the summit of Mount Everest. At first, I thought I would build a memorial chorten as is tradition here, but since Michael did not die in Nepal, I came to a different vision.

Michael grew up in the province of Newfoundland and Labrador. The aboriginal people of Labrador use Inukshuks (stone people) to mark paths and guide people along the featureless tundra. Thinking that we all need guidance and direction, I decided to build an inukshuk for Michael’s spirit.

As I hauled each rock, I thought of each piece representing some part of Michael’s gifts and talents. It was tricky to get all the stones to balance on top of each other. During this time, I thought of Michael’s challenges and obstacles. When I put the crowning rock into place and hung Tibetan prayer flags from the inukshuk’s shoulders, I thought of Michael’s fondness and appreciation of me.

Michael understood that I am happiest when I can combine several passions into one moment. This morning, in Michael’s honour, I brought together mountains, teaching, spirituality, and stonework. I’m sure he would smile at the combination.

After the sculpture was finished, I sat in silence absorbing the same view at the inukshuk (the same one as in today’s picture). When the time was right, I stood, touched the inukshuk’s shoulder, wished Michael peace, and returned to the main trail with my eyes awash in salt water.

There is an award for student athletes at MUN in Michael’s memory. It is called the Michael Beecher Smith Heart Award. If by chance you would like to contribute to this award, please make out your check to Memorial University of Newfoundland and mail it to:

School of Human Kinetics and Recreation

Memorial University of Newfoundland

St. John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador, A1C 5S7 CANADA

Attn: Michael Beecher Smith Award

I hope in the next hours, days, and weeks that I can draw on Michael’s heart, spirit, and determination to do “the thing I think I cannot do.” (Eleanor Roosevelt).

My thoughts and prayers are with Michael’s family as they make their way through this tremendous time of grief, loss, and sorrow.

With both an open and heavy heart,

TA

Posted in Everest 3.0, Everest-007 | Tagged , , , , | 1 Comment

Visual Soliloquy #1272 They who marvel at the beauty of the world in summer will find equal cause for wonder and admiration in winter…

They who marvel at the beauty of the world in summer will find equal cause for wonder and admiration in winter.
–John Burroughs

He who marvels at the beauty of the world in summer will find equal cause for wonder and admiration in winter. John Burroughs
Read more at: https://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/keywords/winter.html

Posted in Photography, Visual Soliloquy | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Of Hands and Helicopters

That’s my left hand holding Climber Smurf as we are traveling to Hebron, Labrador last August to begin our Paddle2Peaks expedition. It’s been a rough year for my hands. I hadn’t realized how rough until just before Christmas when I received some medical treatment that eased the pain for the first time in six months. As Joni Mitchell so aptly said, “You don’t know what you got ’til it’s gone.” I hadn’t truly perceived the level of pain until it was absent. I’m working hard in physiotherapy to keep it that way and trying to be smart and sensible about activity choices. now that I’m pain free…to stay pain free in both the short and long term.

I’m going have a gnarly set of worn out hands when I’m 85 ‘cause I’m already well on my way there now. I consider my hands badges of a well-lived life. I love my hands. They are my connection to my paddle, my ice axe, my keyboard. It’s been tough to have such deep pain and doubt about that connection. Humbling too. It makes me wonder if someday that connection will be permananently broken or too painful to make. This doubt, in turn, makes the connection all the more precious and the activities I can do because of that connection, all the more precious.

The new year is often an occasion for looking back over the last one, for reflection, for seeing the high peaks and the low valleys. 2016, for me and so many others, had its fair share of both.

A friend recorded the series, Everest Air, that aired this fall and I recently watched the series. It was both tough and exhilarating to watch. Seeing the rescues, of course, reminded me of my own helicopter flight (read about it here) off of Everest and issued an invitation to continue processing that experience (and perhaps if I’m honest, triggered a wee bit of the PTSD I still carry from that sudden ending of my expedition). Just as I did in my own flight, I love the views of Everest and Nepal from the air, from above it all. The views of the Khumbu Icefall are breathtaking. Watching some of the episodes, Marian and I have seen remote regions we’ve trekked in and enjoyed the cascade of memories that comes with that reminder. I watched the rescue of one of my teammates during Episode Two. We stop and pause the video when views of my tent at base camp or other camps come into view. (Mine is the last blue one in the series of five blue ones :-))

During Episode Three, Everest Air flew to Makalu to pick up a sick climber. Because the Everest Air crew was picking up that climber, they were busy when the call went out for my pick-up so I was picked up by a different helicopter and crew that also happened to be filming a series about helicopter pilots and rescues in Nepal. That series starts airing tonight on Discovery and is called Everest Rescue. I don’t know which episode exactly my flight will be covered in-only that it comes later in the series.

As folks may remember, I often can’t watch my own media appearances. I often cover my ears and run screaming from the room when an interview comes on. I don’t often have interview remorse these days but it takes me awhile to be ready to watch or listen to myself. I have no doubt that this will be the same. The series crew captured footage in the helicopter, base camp, at Lukla, at the Kathmandu airport, at the hospital, and then in a long interview in Kathmandu the evening before I was heading home. All of that will likely be condensed into a short segment that’s mostly focused on Jason Laing, the pilot who flew me off. Of course, when you consent to being filmed/interviewed in any context, you have no idea how you will be quoted/portrayed/shown but I’m hopeful, given the way the crew treated me throughout, that they will tell the story well and with respect.

I’m sure, once I gather the courage to watch the episode my flight is featured in, I’ll once again be tossed back into those moments, that day, those days, those weeks, that expedition. I’ll have another opportunity to understand the experience, its lessons, and its effects. I’ll see new connections and continue to accept/heal/let go of old ones. I’ll re-live the hope and anticipation of the beginning of the expedition and the bitter disappointment of the unexpected ending, and all points in between. I’ll see how the footage captured the moments and how that looks and feels the same (and likely different) than my lived experience of it. I’ll work with it as I’m ready and able.

Those of you with access to Discovery and in the inclination to watch-enjoy! I ask that you watch it with compassion for all involved-know that I may be a few weeks or months behind in the watching-and that hands and helicopters can both be very intense life experiences understood in the looking back rather than in the moment.

May 2017 bring you adventures of your choosing, teammates to share them with, and Everest sized compassion for you and all!

Posted in Everest 3.0 | Tagged , | 5 Comments

In 2017, what ‘mountain’ will you climb?

Reading this article, by Ashley Fitzpatrick of The Telegram, entitled In 2017, what ‘mountain’ will you climb? brought back many fine memories of my preparation for and climbing of Mount Kilimanjaro. I also enjoyed reflecting on the many folks I’ve coached and assisted to make the same climb including the four sisters mentioned in the article. I always say, “When you take on your Everest (or in this case, your Kilimanjaro), you inspire others around you to do the same. Our Everests and our Kilimanjaros are all different. What is an Everest to one is a Kilimanjaro to another. What is a molehill to me might be an Everest to you…what’s most important is that we keep our eye on “the view”–that goal or passion or avocation that keeps us moving, living, and dreaming-whatever it might be–while at the same time, taking some “footsteps”–actions that move us closer to our goal/dream/view. My Everests for the year are developing and I’ll be ready to share them soon and I hope you’ll follow along-you do know I love having you journey along side us. Stay tuned and wishing you all the best for 2017.

Posted in Kilimanjaro | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Visual Soliloquy #1271 Obstacles are those frightful things you see when you take your eyes off your goal…

Obstacles are those frightful things you see when you take your eyes off your goal.
–Henry Ford
Obstacles are those frightful things you see when you take your eyes off your goal. Henry Ford
Read more at: https://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/keywords/obstacles.html

Posted in Photography, Visual Soliloquy | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Visual Soliloquy #1270 Walking with a friend in the dark is better than walking alone in the light…

Walking with a friend in the dark is better than walking alone in the light.–Helen Keller
Walking with a friend in the dark is better than walking alone in the light. Helen Keller
Read more at: https://www.brainyquote.com/search_results.html?q=light

Posted in Photography, Visual Soliloquy | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

A Book Birth Announcement: The Get-Outside Guide to Winter Activities

It’s a book birth announcement. It weighs 14.7 ounces & after 2 years gestation, it is wonderful to finally hold it! It just arrived from the publisher and it’s beautiful. The book, a collobaration with Andrew Foran and Kevin Redmond, is a fun, informative guide to leading folks outside in winter. We’ve packed it full of fabulous information, tried and true tricks for being warm and comfy outdoors in winter, and many, many activities for folks of all ages. Winter can be fun! The book is available in print and e-book version. You can purchase it directly from the publisher, Human Kinetics, or from your favourite book seller. It’s a great holiday gift 🙂

http://www.humankinetics.com/products/all-products/get-outside-guide-to-winter-activities-the

From the Publisher:

A recent surge in people’s reconnecting with nature has resulted in numerous reference books for outdoor program leaders, but—until now—there has been a dearth of books aimed at wintertime pursuits.

The Get-Outside Guide to Winter Activities unlocks the door to a wealth of fun and adventure in the snow. Activities have been compiled by keepers of the trail, experienced winter trekker leaders who know how to lead people in outdoor winter activities that are safe and fun and help people experience the joy of being active outdoors during the cold months of the year.

This guide offers activities and games that have the following features:

  • Appropriate for multiple age groups
  • Easily modifiable to adapt to varying skillsets
  • Designed for a variety of locales, such as schoolyards, community trails, urban and remote parks, and wilderness settings

The guide offers activities that are suitable for groups of varying skill levels and experience. Most activities are simple and quick and require little preparation and few props. Those interested in doing more can explore snowshoeing or Nordic skiing activities and even exploratory outings and winter day trips from a base camp to overnight or extended camping excursions. The book includes tactical snow games and activities and even has icebreakers for games.

In addition, solo winter trekkers can use the activities and lessons as a launching point to prepare them in leading groups in winter outings. Leaders are shown how to build in activities that call on typical age-level skills of participants. The essential-skills progression built into the activities helps leaders offer instructional strategies that allow all participants to take part within their ability, and leaders are provided with ideas to modify all approaches and activities to ensure inclusion for all in their group.

In addition to the game and activity modifications, the book offers winter facts that enhance participants’ knowledge about the science of snow and winter as well as charts and graphs that focus on safety in winter.

The Get-Outside Guide to Winter Activities offers a planning framework that balances winter fun with skills and safety and prepares leaders to guide others in enjoying activities in the snow. You will learn about activities that require little or no props, adaptive snow games, tips based on actual winter excursions, gear requirements, and leadership suggestions shared by winter experts:

  • How to stay warm and dry while winter camping
  • What and how to eat, drink, and cook in the winter
  • What gear you need for a snow expedition
  • What games and activities are great for campsites
  • How to teach basic snowshoeing and Nordic skiing skills
  • The keys to managing groups outside in winter

You’ll also learn how to make the most of winter opportunities through tried-and-true ideas, skill progressions and games, and activities that open up an entire season’s worth of enjoyment, learning, and adventure.

“People shy away from outdoor winter activities for three reasons,” says Andrew Foran, one of the book’s authors. “There’s an overemphasis on the skills that are thought to be required for participation. Granted, in some cases skills are essential, but it’s how you approach the teaching and practicing of those skills that makes the difference.

“Then there’s a belief that the wintertime outdoors is to be feared rather than embraced. And finally, people are lacking a bank of ideas, of things to do, to keep them engaged and having fun outdoors in the winter.”

The Get-Outside Guide to Winter Activities addresses all three misconceptions—and in the process shows you, as a leader, how to help your participants have fun in the snow, build skills, and create lasting memories that will keep them looking forward to the next big snowfall.

Contents

Preface
AcknowledgmentsPart I Preparing for Winter Fun and Adventure
Chapter 1: Getting Ready to GO
Setting
Five Gs
Planning and Preparation
Nutrition
Hydration
Managing Groups Outside in Winter
Chapter 2: Safety and Risk Management
Assessing Environmental Conditions
Wind Chill
Dehydration and Hypothermia
Risk Management
Phase 1: Before the Activity
Phase 2: During the Activity
Phase 3: Debriefing
Chapter 3: Winter Gear and Clothing
Basic Gear
Wintertime Essentials for the Leader Pack
Winter Travel Gear
SummaryPart II: Fun in the Snow: Games and Activities
Chapter 4: Icebreakers
Five Gs of Activity Planning
Activities
Chapter 5: Play-Based and First Nations Activities
Play-Based Activities
Native (Inuit) and Northern GamesPart III: Trekking
Chapter 6: Snowshoeing
Getting Started
Snowshoeing Equipment
Day Packs and Leader Packs
Snowshoeing Skills
Basic Snowshoeing Games and Activities
Skills for Hills
Advanced Snowshoeing Games and Activities
Running in Snowshoes
Chapter 7: Nordic Skiing
Evolution of Nordic Skiing Technique and Equipment
Dressing for Skiing
Day Packs and Leader Packs
Shelter
Getting Started
Nordic Skiing Skills
Nordic Skiing Games and ActivitiesPart IV: Extending the Trekking Experience
Chapter 8: Winter Camping
Staying Warm and Dry
Eating, Drinking, and Cooking Building a Shelter
Sleeping Warm and Dry
Summary
Chapter 9: Winter Trekking: The Snow Expedition
Winter Trekking Equipment
Group Gear
Leader Gear
Personal Gear
Packing a Toboggan
Thermoregulation: Dressing for Winter Hauling
Leader Tips
Setting Up Camp
Games and Activities to Do in Camp
The Next DayEpilogue
Index
About the Authors

Audiences

A reference for in-service teachers who teach physical education and outdoor education courses.

Posted in Life | Tagged , , , | 3 Comments

Visual Soliloquy #1269 Never bend your head. Always hold it high. Look the world straight in the eye…

Never bend your head. Always hold it high. Look the world straight in the eye.
–Helen Keller

Posted in Photography, Visual Soliloquy | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Visual Soliloquy #1268 The world changes according to the way people see it, and if you can alter, even by a millimetre, the way people look at reality, then you can change the world…

The world changes according to the way people see it, and if you can alter, even by a millimeter, the way people look at reality, then you can change the world.
-James Baldwin

Posted in Photography, Visual Soliloquy | Tagged , , , , | 2 Comments

Everest 3.0: Out of the Fog, Flights to Nowhere, and Seeing the Mountain Blush

It’s been a foggy day here. Reminiscent of many other foggy days. One in particular, where I had a flight to Halifax. We took off in fog and flew almost all the way to Halifax but couldn’t land. We turned around and flew back to St. John’s and were able to land. I remember the discombobulation of the situation and asking myself, “Did I actually just go anywhere?” The days following that “non-flight” were unique as well because my YYT life was completely open and cleared because of the trip to Halifax…so I had two totally unscheduled days at home because of my flight to nowhere.

I haven’t been writing much lately. There hasn’t been much down time so far this fall between travels, presentations, and outreach to schools. I’ve wanted to write. Longed to write. But also didn’t. Because writing would demand that I sit still, slow down, and let the fog that has been swirling around me since May blow away. I was startled yesterday to do the math and see that almost six months has passed since I returned from Everest 3.0. It’s been a rich and full time… full of recovery, disappointment, and short travels here and there.

I’m not the best at in and out travel. Better at all in. Or better at all out. Transitioning so much between in and out has me a bit tired so I’m glad to have carved out an evening to sit and write. To catch the words that drifted by this morning as I stared at the Everest poster in our entry way before heading out into the shaggy fog that enveloped the city like newly shorn wool.

Staring at the poster, I wondered what I’d accomplished with Everest 3.0. Since I’d reached a similar height as I did on Everest 2.0, had I, like the ill-fated Halifax flight above, really gone anywhere? Had this expedition made a difference to me or to others? What did I learn from the experience? What do I want to take from it into future expeditions? In that glance at the poster, I saw the fog I’d been living in, with, and through since returning because I hadn’t stopped to ponder the deeper answers to the above questions.

The two most common questions I’m asked…often several times each day…often by complete strangers (and by dear friends as well) are 1) What are you climbing next? and 2) Will you try Everest again? My current answer to both questions is “I don’t know.” For the first time in a long time, I don’t have a plant ticket to anywhere. I have some ideas floating around. It likely won’t be too much longer before a next trip crystalizes in my “snow globe” and a ticket purchased. But for now, I don’t know.

The most sustaining emotion I have about Everest 3.0 is disappointment. Not disappointment about not reaching the top (is that a double negative?) but disappointment about how the expedition ended. The ending was so unexpected. So sudden. With so little closure with the mountain and my teammates. When I made the decision to ask for flight assistance over the Khumbu Icefall, (not wanting to expose my teammates to extra risk by spending extra time with me in one of the most dangerous parts of the mountain,) I hadn’t fully comprehended the end game and how subsequent decisions would spiral out of my control.

I wrote a piece about the helicopter flight out for the inaugural issue of Panorama: The Journal of Intelligent Travel. You can read it by clicking the link. In that piece, I explore my two-mindnessness during that flight–both so not wanting to be having the experience and so enjoying the view. The flight propelled me from the mountain heights to the valley lows. I was so suddenly displaced with no clothes, shoes, money or identification that it took a few days to work all of that out all the while suffering from a middle ear disturbance from the flight. It was total and utter discombobulation on all levels. Hope to return to trek with my friends came and went. Hope to return to the mountain came and went. Want to return home came and was granted by the sudden availability of a flight home. Camp Three to home in less than a week.

What I really wanted and hoped for in Everest 3.0 was a true shot at the summit. The summit would have been gravy. The maraschino cheery on the top of the Everest sundae. Instead, I left St. John’s with a nagging cough that likely caught up to me during the expedition through either walking pneumonia or HAPE depending on whose analysis of it all you want to go with.

So…no true shot for me this go-round, no ground gained over previous attempts, no closure granted, just a gapping crevasse of disappointment. I’ve needed to find a snow bridge to use to cross over-or perhaps an Icefall Doctor’s ladder would do the trick…So as the fog began to drop this morning, I could dare to see…if my core wants/needs/aims/goals/vision for the expedition weren’t met by this attempt, what was? What was accomplished?

If I cross over the far side of the crevasse, with knees weak and weary from the effort, with safety ropes tightly grasped in my hands, with tentative steps taken over the rickety ladder, I can see that I did go some place, that many things were accomplished, and that once again, disappointment is and will be my teacher. The other side of the foggy ladder reveals a celebration in deciding to go back. In deciding to risk “failure” again. In knowing that I might not get higher. That I might get/be lower or slower or older. That I faced fears both internal and external to go back. Knowing that it was harder to go back for Everest 2.0 that Everest 1.0. Harder still to decide to go back for Everest 3.0 knowing how tough and exacting and demanding the path to and up Everest is… that I would decide to stretch again for a third time. That is a victory. A win. A thing to be celebrated and shouted off hill tops.

I’m proud that I trained hard, prepared well, and went ready for the challenge. I’m proud of my HKR students who prepared an excellent school engagement program. I’m proud of having visited many schools before and after the expedition. That many schools were active participants in the expedition. That I had a tweet-fest with one of my co-chairs in learning and teaching. That I showed kids that it’s OK to try and that sometimes we don’t get to climb as high as we want to. That Climber Smurf is an awesome climbing partner. That my expeditions/explorations/adventures are like a crossword puzzle-it’s important to have UP, DOWN, and ACROSS. That there is a time and a season for everything. Including rest and regrouping. That I dug deep, bringing forth footsteps from the deepest part of myself. That I respected my limits, real or imagined or enforced. That I respected my teammates and Nepali climbing staff. That I shared much of the expedition in real time with creativity and joy. That I continue(d) to be in the public eye as a public dreamer and that I’m willing to answer most any question about climbing Everest in most any setting whenever asked. For all of the above and more, I am proud and I know in the ultimate equation makes living with/though the disappointment worth it.

What did I learn for next time?

These are a few of the things I’m putting into my backpack for future expeditions…it’s wonderful to climb with teammates I know, that there is a delicate balance between adequate acclimatization and wearing yourself out at altitude-that you must do enough of the first with as little of the second…the first being priority. That managing mind and emotions are important along with managing body (Can you really separate them?). That it’s always easier to take pictures on sunny, good weather days but the story might be in the storms.

That I like the word that.

That the world of blue, white and ice is worth taking such hard steps to see and experience. That there is a balance between training and life. Finding the minimum effective dose is a good aim but also make sure you use all the tools in your toolkit. Train all intelligences (i.e. mind, body, spirit, kinesthetic, creative, etc.). Share all of the above.

Believe. Train. Love. Repeat.

That I’m OK always. No matter what is happening or what I am doing or not doing. That the biggest mountain is within as are the deepest valleys. And that we must come down from the summit again and again. Keep it fun. Keep it real. Keep it real fun. Work hard. Enjoy the work. Temper the work with fun and community.

Don’t lose sight of the true summit. Like an airplane exit, it might be behind you.

And always, enjoy the view because it is pure magic to see alpine glow dancing across the crisp flanks of stoic mountain…and seeing the mountain blush.

Posted in Everest 3.0, Life | Tagged , , , | 6 Comments

Visual Soliloquy #1267 Life is a tapestry woven by the decisions we make…

Life is a tapestry woven by the decisions we make.
― Sherrilyn Kenyon

Posted in Photography, Visual Soliloquy | Tagged , , , , | 1 Comment

Visual Soliloquy #1266 I will be the gladdest thing under the sun! I will touch a hundred flowers and not pick one…

I will be the gladdest thing under the sun! I will touch a hundred flowers and not pick one.
–Edna St. Vincent Millay

Posted in Photography, Visual Soliloquy | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Visual Soliloquy #1265 Progress is impossible without change, and those who cannot change their minds cannot change anything…

Progress is impossible without change, and those who cannot change their minds cannot change anything.
–George Bernard Shaw
Progress is impossible without change, and those who cannot change their minds cannot change anything.
Read more at: http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/authors/g/george_bernard_shaw.html

Posted in Photography, Visual Soliloquy | Tagged , , , , | 1 Comment

Visual Soliloquy #1264 They say a person needs just three things to be truly happy in this world: someone to love, something to do, and something to hope for…

They say a person needs just three things to be truly happy in this world: someone to love, something to do, and something to hope for.
― Tom Bodett

Posted in Photography, Visual Soliloquy | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Visual Soliloquy #1663 It’s okay to spin around and around in the same place. Just so long as you’re singing your heart out…

It’s okay to spin around and around in the same place. Just so long as you’re singing your heart out.
― Chica Umino

Posted in Photography, Visual Soliloquy | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Visual Soliloquy #1262 Did you ever wonder if the person in the puddle is real, and you’re just a reflection of them?

Did you ever wonder if the person in the puddle is real, and you’re just a reflection of them?
― Bill Watterson

Posted in Photography, Visual Soliloquy | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Visual Soliloquy #1261: We always see the point of an iceberg. So I’ve always accepted the idea that people – they don’t necessarily know everything I am…

We always see the point of an iceberg. So I’ve always accepted the idea that people – they don’t necessarily know everything I am…
–Olivier Theyskens

Posted in Photography, Visual Soliloquy | Tagged , , , , | 1 Comment

Visual Soliloquy #1260: Over every mountain there is a path, although it may not be seen from the valley…

Over every mountain there is a path, although it may not be seen from the valley.
–Theodore Roethke

Over every mountain there is a path, although it may not be seen from the valley.
Read more at: http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/quotes/t/theodorero120661.html?src=t_mountain

Posted in Photography, Visual Soliloquy | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Visual Soliloquy #1259: If flowers want to grow right out of concrete sidewalk cracks I’m going to bend down and smell them…

If flowers want to grow right out of concrete sidewalk cracks I’m going to bend down and smell them.
–David Ignitor

Posted in Photography, Visual Soliloquy | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Five Peak Challenge Complete

Today we completed our “Five Peak Challenge”. We climbed to the highest peak of each country of the United Kingdom and Ireland. It’s been an awesome trip of climbing and road tripping. We’ve climbed the equivalent of about 35 Signal Hills and driven about 4200 kilometres! More soon! The picture above is from Carrontoohil, Ireland’s highest peaks do our fifth of the Five Peak Challenge.

Posted in Life | Tagged , , | 3 Comments

Audio Post

Posted in Labrador, Paddle 2 Peaks | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Audio Post

Posted in Labrador, Paddle 2 Peaks | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Check-in/OK message from SPOT TA

TA
Latitude:58.44980
Longitude:-62.79947
GPS location Date/Time:08/21/2016 17:54:41 NDT

Message:Paddle 2 Peaks: TA & Marian are paddling in Northern Labrador. Check map 2 see where they are & cheer them on!

Click the link below to see where I am located.
http://fms.ws/aRUZS/58.44980N/62.79947W

If the above link does not work, try this link:

TA

You have received this message because TA has added you to their SPOT contact list.

Ready for Adventure
FindMeSPOT.com

Posted in Labrador, Paddle 2 Peaks | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Audio Post

Posted in Labrador, Paddle 2 Peaks | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Check-in/OK message from SPOT TA

TA
Latitude:58.48222
Longitude:-62.66092
GPS location Date/Time:08/20/2016 21:33:24 NDT

Message:Paddle 2 Peaks: TA & Marian are paddling in Northern Labrador. Check map 2 see where they are & cheer them on!

Click the link below to see where I am located.
http://fms.ws/aQ0p_/58.48222N/62.66092W

If the above link does not work, try this link:

TA

You have received this message because TA has added you to their SPOT contact list.

Ready for Adventure
FindMeSPOT.com

Posted in Labrador, Paddle 2 Peaks | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Audio Post

Posted in Labrador, Paddle 2 Peaks | Tagged , , , , | 1 Comment

Audio Post

Posted in Labrador, Paddle 2 Peaks | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Check-in/OK message from SPOT TA

TA
Latitude:58.19810
Longitude:-62.62549
GPS location Date/Time:08/19/2016 18:05:00 NDT

Message:Paddle 2 Peaks: TA & Marian are paddling in Northern Labrador. Check map 2 see where they are & cheer them on!

Click the link below to see where I am located.
http://fms.ws/aNVnI/58.19810N/62.62549W

If the above link does not work, try this link:

TA

You have received this message because TA has added you to their SPOT contact list.

Ready for Adventure
FindMeSPOT.com

Posted in Labrador, Paddle 2 Peaks | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Audio Post

Posted in Labrador, Paddle 2 Peaks | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Check-in/OK message from SPOT TA

TA
Latitude:58.12124
Longitude:-62.46774
GPS location Date/Time:08/18/2016 20:05:34 NDT

Message:Paddle 2 Peaks: TA & Marian are paddling in Northern Labrador. Check map 2 see where they are & cheer them on!

Click the link below to see where I am located.
http://fms.ws/aLUuu/58.12124N/62.46774W

If the above link does not work, try this link:

TA

You have received this message because TA has added you to their SPOT contact list.

Ready for Adventure
FindMeSPOT.com

Posted in Labrador, Paddle 2 Peaks | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Audio Post

Posted in Labrador, Paddle 2 Peaks | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Check-in/OK message from SPOT TA

TA
Latitude:58.12122
Longitude:-62.46786
GPS location Date/Time:08/17/2016 19:18:00 NDT

Message:Paddle 2 Peaks: TA & Marian are paddling in Northern Labrador. Check map 2 see where they are & cheer them on!

Click the link below to see where I am located.
http://fms.ws/aJ5P-/58.12122N/62.46786W

If the above link does not work, try this link:

TA

You have received this message because TA has added you to their SPOT contact list.

Ready for Adventure
FindMeSPOT.com

Posted in Labrador, Paddle 2 Peaks | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Audio Post

Posted in Labrador, Paddle 2 Peaks | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Check-in/OK message from SPOT TA

TA
Latitude:57.99692
Longitude:-62.23105
GPS location Date/Time:08/16/2016 18:22:56 NDT

Message:Paddle 2 Peaks: TA & Marian are paddling in Northern Labrador. Check map 2 see where they are & cheer them on!

Click the link below to see where I am located.
http://fms.ws/aGfiK/57.99692N/62.23105W

If the above link does not work, try this link:

TA

You have received this message because TA has added you to their SPOT contact list.

Ready for Adventure
FindMeSPOT.com

Posted in Labrador, Paddle 2 Peaks | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Audio Post

Posted in Labrador, Paddle 2 Peaks | Tagged , , , , | 1 Comment

Check-in/OK message from SPOT TA

TA
Latitude:57.89604
Longitude:-62.01614
GPS location Date/Time:08/15/2016 16:09:21 NDT

Message:Paddle 2 Peaks: TA & Marian are paddling in Northern Labrador. Check map 2 see where they are & cheer them on!

Click the link below to see where I am located.
http://fms.ws/aE2Xq/57.89604N/62.01614W

If the above link does not work, try this link:

TA

You have received this message because TA has added you to their SPOT contact list.

Ready for Adventure
FindMeSPOT.com

Posted in Labrador, Paddle 2 Peaks | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Audio Post

Posted in Labrador, Paddle 2 Peaks | Tagged , , , , | 2 Comments

Check-in/OK message from SPOT TA

TA
Latitude:57.89610
Longitude:-62.01611
GPS location Date/Time:08/14/2016 15:30:39 NDT

Message:Paddle 2 Peaks: TA & Marian are paddling in Northern Labrador. Check map 2 see where they are & cheer them on!

Click the link below to see where I am located.
http://fms.ws/aBp1i/57.89610N/62.01611W

If the above link does not work, try this link:

TA

You have received this message because TA has added you to their SPOT contact list.

Ready for Adventure
FindMeSPOT.com

Posted in Labrador, Paddle 2 Peaks | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Audio Post

Posted in Labrador, Paddle 2 Peaks | Tagged , , , , | 2 Comments